Single Stream Recycling Equipment

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Our State-of-the-Art Recycling Equipment

TC Recycling recently installed a Green Machine single stream recycling system.

Our new equipment can process 600 tons of recyclable materials per week. Those materials might otherwise have ended up in Seneca Landfill. While landfills are necessary and have many benefits, their space is limited and certain materials do not break down quickly. Recyclable materials linger in landfills, taking up valuable space, for years or longer.

By processing more materials with greater accuracy, we help ensure that plastics, metals, paper and other recyclable materials are able to be reused instead of wasted. This saves space in the landfill as well as conserving natural resources used to make consumer goods.

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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

MRFS - Materials Recovery Facilities and Recycling


By Steve Last




When many of us see the term MRFs we think that the official name for these facilities is a Material Recycling Facility, and this in many ways is what they are. However, waste management professionals will tell you that the correct term for them is Materials Recovery Facilities (MRFs).

MRFs are a waste management option specifically linked to recycling, bridging the gap between collection of recyclables and reprocessing. However, it has not strictly been correct in many districts in the past to have said that they were solely for the purpose of recycling. Both within and outside Europe (the EU) a proportion of the waste is now and will be for the foreseeable future, sent to landfill. In a commercially based and unregulated MRF only those materials which could profitably be recycled by the operator would be.

However, due to public pressure and in principle environmentally sound reasons in most parts of the world it has been found that recycling should not just be a largely voluntary activity carried out only where the market provides an economic benefit from such recycling. Due to risk and price volatility in the recycled materials market, without government encouragement, recycling has simply just not been taking place to the extent that, any consideration of the long sustainability of civilization, was going to need.

In short, society was rapidly moving toward the point of burial under its own rubbish. Worse and more pervasive still was, and is still, the danger from the gradual contamination of groundwater around the landfills, by the landfills. If this was allowed to continue might have a far more serious effect on the health of society than the rubbish itself. The reason for this being that so many areas rely on their groundwater for drinking water.

Therefore, MRFs perform an increasingly important role for communities in many countries. Indeed, many more of them are going to be needed to provide much increased waste recycling, in each and every district, of all our towns and cities. MRFs are also essential to the planned reduction in the amount of organic matter which will be sent to landfills throughout the EU.

This is recognised by the UK government as they form an important role within the Government's Waste Strategy 2000 (DETR 2000a and DETR 2000b), which predicts that as many as 316 MRFs (DETR 2000b: 194) will be required to meet its aims in England and Wales alone. Why reduce organic matter being sent to landfills? The reason is that the organic matter is the main source of pollutants in any Municipal Solid Waste landfills.

So, at its core any Material Recovery/Recycling Facility is a waste disposal facility that separates the recycling material before it is sold on and recycled, and as far as possible, they are operated to be as "self funding" as possible. However, although all council and private MRF operator's waste services departments do attempt to identify sustainable and profitable markets for the recycled material, into which they sell their recovered materials, the earnings created do not come close to meeting the very high operating costs.

It is interesting to note that the UK Waste Strategy 2000 recognises that a system based on new facilities and extensive separate kerbside collection of recyclables will be an important element in meeting recovery targets. But, the driving force in this process is the attainment of the targets, and any revenue from this is incidental. In the document, it states that it is hoped that this may increase the economic viability of recycling schemes, including kerbside collection, by allowing localized sorting of materials (see paragraphs 5.19 - 5.22). As stable markets develop and a demand is established for the recyclates, it may be that the value of the recycled materials rises. However, this is only a hope of government, and cannot be guaranteed.

So, recycling initiatives and operations are driven by the need to meet statutory targets. Recycling involves collecting materials that can be marketed to produce more products containing a percentage of recycled materials such as paper, cardboard, cans, glass and plastic bottles. The process means that less raw materials will need to be mined (metals) or grown (trees) and less energy will be consumed in the manufacture of new products.

Now you have read this article you will not be one of those ignorant of the important role of the MRF in your district. In fact waste management is far from a boring subject, and there are rapid developments in the technology and large expansion plans taking place right now.

There many new ideas and new opportunities to discovery in the new Waste Technologies. Find out more about what MRFs are, plus you will learn about many other types of waste technology. These exciting new technologies will help ensure a sustainable future for society, and the health of future generations.




Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Steve_Last/25401


http://EzineArticles.com/?MRFS---Materials-Recovery-Facilities-and-Recycling&id=1266772



Green Machine Recycling Equipment Manufacturer

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

The Importance Of PVC Recycling


By Mark Shuholm




Polyvinyl chloride, more commonly known as PVC, is one of the most used plastics in the United States. It is used in construction because of its effectiveness over traditional materials such as copper, iron, or wood. With so much being used, PVC recycling is important, not only for industries to get rid of the PVC waste, but to purchase recycled PVC as well.

Plastic surrounds everyone. It is found in tools, equipment, food containers, toys, decor, and more. Plastic is one of the most commonly used materials on the planet. Specifically, PVC is used in plumbing systems, door and window frames, and roof trimmings in the construction industry.

PVC can be made softer and more flexible when plasticizers are added, especially phthalates. When it is softer and flexible, PVC can be used in clothing and upholstery, electrical cable insulation, inflatable products, and other applications when it resembles rubber. It can also be used to create flat sheets for signs and is accessed by the healthcare and flooring industries.

Scrap plastics can be expensive headaches in the industrial process. Not only did companies pay for the plastic that is lying in a scrap heap, but getting rid of it can be a pain. There are some recycling companies that will buy unused plastic from companies in order for it to be recycled. Waste can be turned into revenue this way, and recycling companies will handles every step of the recycling process.

Plastic can be extremely damaging when dumped in landfills or incinerated. Responsible disposal is important, but companies can reap many benefits selling their plastic to a recycling company. Purchased plastic helps companies reclaim expenses incurred from buying the plastic. Instead of paying landfill costs, revenue is increased.

EPA and industry environmental standards will be met and even surpassed due to a recycling corporation's high processing standards. The company's green image is enhanced in the public eye. This is public relations gold and will enhance a company's position in the community. Being green shows the company cares deeply for the community.

Companies can save even more money by purchasing PVC and other plastics from a recycled vendor. These same companies will sell back the reprocessed plastic resins and plastic polymers. This is an environmental solution to the resource needs of manufacturers of plastic products.

Buying recycled plastic resins are a cost effective solution, as long as purchasers find a company that still provides quality plastic. The plastic resins and specialty polymers should be subjected to a variety of recognized testing to ensure the purity and quality is fully certified and undeniable.

Resins should provide options to customers, allowing them to choose between regrind, pulverized, pellet, or repro forms at competitive prices. Regrind is when scrap plastic is chopped and ground into small flakes or straps.

Pulverized grinds the plastic down into a fine powder to make it easier for certain manufacturers to process the material into new plastic products. Only polycarbonate, HDPE polypropylene, and PVC are available for pulverizing. Pelletizing melts waste plastic down to remove impurities and mold the plastic into pellet form. Almost all plastics can be supplied in pelletized form.

A recycling company should recycle plastic to the exact specifications of the customer and deliver what they wanted on time. Their recycling efforts are maximized allowing lower costs for manufacturers of plastic products and enhancing the green standards of the plastics industry.

The global markets make the price of plastics fluctuate greatly. A recycling company needs to promise to adjust their rates in strict accordance with the best business ethics. This is how buyers can be certain they will get the lowest resins prices at any time.

Northwest Polymers is an industry leader in post-industrial plastic recycling. This leadership position has been established with a broad asset and experience base in plastic recovery capabilities combined with an extensive knowledge of the secondary plastics marketplace. They have grown into the largest recycler of vinyl and PVC in the Western United States. They have expanded to include specialized processing and solution based marketing of materials, including polyethylene, polypropylene, ABS, and Styrene. Northwest Polymers offers unique and comprehensive solutions for the designing, building, and managing of systems that transform industrial plastic waste into a sustainable and reusable raw material. Visit their website at http://www.nwpoly.com/.




Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Mark_Shuholm/1689938


http://EzineArticles.com/?The-Importance-Of-PVC-Recycling&id=8069878




Green Machine Recycling Equipment Manufacturer

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Progressive Waste Solutions Opens Single Stream Plant In Tampa Area

Progressive Waste Solutions Opens Single Stream Plant In Tampa Area St. Petersburgh FL, Progressive Waste Solutions has recently opened a new Materials St. Petersburgh FL, Progressive Waste Solutions has recently opened a new Materials Recovery Facility in the Tampa area. The newly commissioned system is designed to process both Residential Single Stream and Commercial Dry Waste recyclable materials.https://greenmachine.com/waste-recycling-equipment-manufacturer/progressive-waste-solutions-opens-single-stream-plant-in-tampa-area/

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Paper Waste Management Through Paper Recycling


By Naveen Kumawat




Paper waste constitutes almost one-third of the solid waste generated across the globe. Before, paper waste was either disposed in landfills, taking up a lot of space, or was incinerated. The combustion of paper through incineration releases carbon dioxide, disturbing the natural atmospheric balance. The enhanced greenhouse effect is responsible for global warming and climate change, making landfill disposal and incineration unsuitable and harmful options for paper waste management.

Paper recycling is a "green" solution for the management of paper waste. Recycling paper is a process that converts waste paper into reusable paper and other products.

The practice of recycling paper consists of the following stages:

Collection - Paper waste, such as newspapers, printer paper, and cardboard and product boxes, is collected by placing recycle bins in public places, schools, offices and households. The collection process is carried by municipal organizations and private companies that specialize in the recycling of waste.

Sorting - After it's collected, paper waste is sorted into different piles depending on the quality and type of paper. The piles are then compressed to form bales and these bales are used to produce recycled paper.

Shredding - During the production of recycled wafer-thin, waste paper is cut into small bits. These bits are further broken down into fibres.

Re-pulping - The fibres are then mixed with water to form pulp. This pulp may contain various unwanted components such as dirt, old ink, and weak fibres

De-inking - The pulp is washed, segregated, sieved and rotated. As a result, dirt, old ink and weak fibres get separated from the pulp in the form of sludge that is later discarded. The clean pulp is utilized to produce recycled paper and other products such as egg crates, fruit trays, paper cardboard, insulation and false ceilings.

Papers Recycling is an environmentally friendly process that, for one thing, helps limit deforestation practices. Many plant and animal species become extinct when their natural habitat is destroyed because of deforestation. When trees are cut down, it also disturbs the balance of the gases in the atmosphere. One ton of recycled paper can save up to 17 trees from being cut down. In terms of energy-saving, the production of recycled requires 40 to 60% less energy than paper manufactured from virgin pulp; each ton of recycled paper saves approximately 225 kilowatt hours of energy. Furthermore, every ton of recycled paper saves 60,000 litres of water - a great benefit since the production of fresh paper uses large amounts of water.

These are just some of the many ways recycling paper can benefit the planet and contribute to a sustainable environment for future generations.

You can get more information about Paper Recycling services by visiting Metal Recycling Services




Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Naveen_Kumawat/842726


http://EzineArticles.com/?Paper-Waste-Management-Through-Paper-Recycling&id=6913118




Green Machine Recycling Equipment Manufacturer

Paper Waste Management Through Paper Recycling


By Naveen Kumawat




Paper waste constitutes almost one-third of the solid waste generated across the globe. Before, paper waste was either disposed in landfills, taking up a lot of space, or was incinerated. The combustion of paper through incineration releases carbon dioxide, disturbing the natural atmospheric balance. The enhanced greenhouse effect is responsible for global warming and climate change, making landfill disposal and incineration unsuitable and harmful options for paper waste management.

Paper recycling is a "green" solution for the management of paper waste. Recycling paper is a process that converts waste paper into reusable paper and other products.

The practice of recycling paper consists of the following stages:

Collection - Paper waste, such as newspapers, printer paper, and cardboard and product boxes, is collected by placing recycle bins in public places, schools, offices and households. The collection process is carried by municipal organizations and private companies that specialize in the recycling of waste.

Sorting - After it's collected, paper waste is sorted into different piles depending on the quality and type of paper. The piles are then compressed to form bales and these bales are used to produce recycled paper.

Shredding - During the production of recycled wafer-thin, waste paper is cut into small bits. These bits are further broken down into fibres.

Re-pulping - The fibres are then mixed with water to form pulp. This pulp may contain various unwanted components such as dirt, old ink, and weak fibres

De-inking - The pulp is washed, segregated, sieved and rotated. As a result, dirt, old ink and weak fibres get separated from the pulp in the form of sludge that is later discarded. The clean pulp is utilized to produce recycled paper and other products such as egg crates, fruit trays, paper cardboard, insulation and false ceilings.

Papers Recycling is an environmentally friendly process that, for one thing, helps limit deforestation practices. Many plant and animal species become extinct when their natural habitat is destroyed because of deforestation. When trees are cut down, it also disturbs the balance of the gases in the atmosphere. One ton of recycled paper can save up to 17 trees from being cut down. In terms of energy-saving, the production of recycled requires 40 to 60% less energy than paper manufactured from virgin pulp; each ton of recycled paper saves approximately 225 kilowatt hours of energy. Furthermore, every ton of recycled paper saves 60,000 litres of water - a great benefit since the production of fresh paper uses large amounts of water.

These are just some of the many ways recycling paper can benefit the planet and contribute to a sustainable environment for future generations.

You can get more information about Paper Recycling services by visiting� Metal Recycling Services




Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Naveen_Kumawat/842726


http://EzineArticles.com/?Paper-Waste-Management-Through-Paper-Recycling&id=6913118


Saturday, June 9, 2018

Paper Recycling - History and Processing


By Michael Russell




Paper is an example of a valuable material that can be recycled. Its wood fibers are reused five to seven times before they become too short and brittle. Possible products are paper and corrugated cardboard, egg cartons, fruit trays, ceiling and wall insulation and many others.

However, paper has not always been made from wood pulp. The Chinese government official and scholar Ts'ai Lun is said to be the first who developed paper from bamboo fibers, mulberry bark, linen and China grass in the year 105 A.D.

History

Newer research proves that paper was already produced 200 years earlier. Beside the already mentioned non-wood papermaking fibers, hemp, rags and fishing nets were used as source of material for the first recycled paper.

Paper has its name from the papyrus plant. In Ancient Egypt about 4,000 years ago, its leaves were pounded flat and used to write on.

The secret of paper production was protected for many years. The Japanese got to know it only in the year 610 A.D. The art of making paper spread slowly all over the world; it came to the Arab world by the eighth century and via the Middle East to Spain. In Europe, the first paper was produced in the 12th century (1144 in Xativa near Valencia).

Until Gutenberg's Bible (1456) the manuscripts consisted of parchment - the skin of a sheep or goat prepared for writing - or of vellum (skin of a calf). Most of the time there was a shortage of linen - the main source of material for paper.

In 1719, the French scientist Rene de Reaumur observed wasps chewing slivers of wood and building their nest from the fiber paste. He had the idea that paper could be made of wood fibers. He wrote it down, but never tested it himself. Still until the 19th century almost exclusively old cloth rags were used for paper production.

The chemical process of breaking down wood was invented in 1829 and the German Friedrich Keller found a method of grinding wood efficiently in 1843. This was the starting point of the success story of making paper from wood pulp and paper recycling.

The process of converting waste paper into a usable product

Waste paper is pre-sorted and collected by the consumer. He takes it to a local recycling center or recycling bin.

The collected papers are brought to a plant where they are sorted and pressed to bales. Lighter papers can be separated from heavier papers and contaminants by a stream of air. The bales are stored in warehouses until they are needed.

In a repulping process, the waste paper is chopped and broken down into fibres and mixed with water creating the pulp.

This pulp must be cleaned from contaminants in a deinking process, which can combine washing, separating, sieving and rotating the fibers. The excess materials, mainly old ink and weak fibers, are skimmed off or dropped through centrifugal force into the sludge. It is then landfilled, burned or used otherwise.

Now the fibre is ready to be made into a new paper product. If white paper is needed a bleaching process follows using hydrogen peroxide, chlorine dioxide or oxygen. The clean pulp is either mixed with virgin fibres or used alone.

Michael Russell Your Independent guide to Recycling [http://recycling-guided.com/]




Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Michael_Russell/12389


http://EzineArticles.com/?Paper-Recycling---History-and-Processing&id=336977